By Megha Mohan
Gender and identity reporter

Publishedduration10 FebruaryshareSharenocloseShare pagelinkCopy linkAbout sharingimage copyrightRose Kalemba

Last year Rose Kalemba wrote a blog post explaining how hard it had been – when she was raped as a 14-year-old girl – to get a video of the attack removed from a popular porn website. Dozens of people then contacted her to say that they were facing the same problem today.

The nurse stopped at the doorway leading out of Rose's hospital room and turned to face her.

"I'm sorry this happened to you," she said, her voice shaking. "My daughter was raped too."

Rose looked at the nurse. She couldn't be older than 40, Rose thought, her daughter must be young, like me.

She thought back to the morning after the assault, to the conversations with the emotionless policeman and the clinical doctor. Everyone had used the phrase "alleged" when referring to the violent, hours-long overnight attack that Rose had described to them. With the exception of her father and grandmother, most of her relatives hadn't believed her either.

With the nurse it was different.

"She believed me," Rose says.

It was a small crack of hope – someone recognising and acknowledging what had happened to her. A wave of relief washed over her, which felt like it could be the start of her recovery.

But soon hundreds of thousands of people would see the rape for themselves and from those viewers she received no sympathy.